IT Services : About Us | Network Services | E Solutions | Completed Projects| Site Map | SMS Service | Feed Back| Contact us
Home | Tourism | Learn Islam | Weather Update | IT Corner | Artistic Corner   
 

Tourism

Basic Information
Map of Pakistan
History
Culture
Cities
Valleys
Lakes
Mountains
Treks
Trekking Info
Maps
Tombs & Mosques
Museums
Parks
Festivals
Passes
Tours
Tour Scheduler
Hotels
Fairs
Travelers
Distance Finder
Glaciers
Airports
Rent a Car
Photo Gallery
Other Information

Ziarat Valley

 

Quaid-e-Azam Residency || Ziarat ||

Pakistan has a number of beautiful valleys, enchanting their spectators with enthralling beauty but Ziarat's is importance and an archaic treasure of Junipers forests. Situated about 122 km in the north of metropolis city of Quetta in Baluchistan, this popular picnic resort is at the elevation of 8,200 feet from the sea level. The summers in the valley are always pleasant, attracting a number of tourists, and the winters extremely harsh. Junipers forests, which are one of the world oldest, are the main source of lush green vista of the Ziarat valley. some of the trees in Junipers forests had been sowed as long as 5000 years ago, making Ziarat as the second biggest Junipers valley in the world.

The word Ziarat means a 'shrine' (grave of a holy man). A folklore tells a saint, Kharwari Baba, who is believed to have stayed in the valley and blessed it. He was a member of Sarangzai tribe and his original name was Mulla Tahir. Later he became a disciple of Nana Sahib. A number of miracles are attributed to Khurwari Baba. The shrine of Khurwari Baba, after which Ziarat was named, is located 8 km away from Ziarat and is visited by a large number of people to pay attribute to the divine soul.
Ziarat takes pride in hosting Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan on a number of occasions. He also spent the last days of his life in a government residency there.
This monumental residency was built in 1882 by the British government and till independence was in the use of the agents of the British governor general for India as their summer headquarters.
The residency is embellished with beautiful lawns, covered with grassy carpets and with roses, dancing at the rhythmic tunes of wind, all around the garden. From there one can have a striking view of the picturesque valley.

Ziarat - the capital of Ziarat District of the Balochistan sits at an altitude of 2543 metres (8346 feet). It is famous for the reason that Mr.Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan stayed here during the last few days of his life in September 1948. The site was chosen for the ailing great man because Ziarat offers the best of the climates, specially in the summers. Besides, Mr. Jinnah had great personal liking for Ziarat. It is because of this reason that the small double storey Ziarat Residency has won the position of a national monument. The hills around Ziarat are thickly wooded and are home to the world's second largest Juniper trees. The junipers are considered to be the real treasure of Ziarat. There are trees in the valley which are more than 7000 years old. In Ziarat a herb called Ephedra sinica is found in abundance from which a chemical called ephedrine is extracted, an important constituent of various medicines, especially cough syrups. When the snow falls in Ziarat's winter the juniper valley is at its most beautiful. The local dish of Ziarat is "saji". More tourists visit the place in summer. Read More about Juniper Forests.

Ziarat literally means a place for pilgrimage. Ziarat as a small dwelling existed much before the advent of thc British Rule in the Sub-continent. Its local name then was Gwuskhi or Kowashki and was changed to its present name of Ziarat in 1886. It derived its name from the neighbouring shrine of famous Muslim saint Mian Abdul Hakim, popularly known as Mulla Tahir and Kharwari Baba. The shrine is situated in the valley, below the "Prospect Point (see photo below)", south of Ziarat Town. According to a legend, the Saint came here from Khandahar in Afghanistan, He opposed the highhandedness of Ghlzai King Hussain. He was forced to leave his native town and migrated to this place. On reaching this valley he took abode on a hill top and prayed for this place saying: "This place shall flourish". Thereafter water started oozing from the spot which is still flowing and is regarded as holy and wholesome.

Ziarat was first selected as health resort by the British in 1883. Till then it was a remote area with few mud houses. The history of Ziarat during the British colonial administration is the same as that of the Sibi district of which it was a part until 1986. The area came under British colonial influence by the middle of the last century, and was made a part of British India in 1887 like the rest of the old Sibi district. Two years earlier, in 1885, the British Government had acquired land for construction of a civil station (at the present Ziarat town), on payment of Rs.1,400,000 to the Saidzai sub section of the Sarangzai tribe. Before the creation of Sibi district (in 1903), Ziarat used to be the summer headquarters of Thal and Chutiali District (Duki Sajavi Sub Division). Later when the Sibi District was created in 1903, it became Sibi District’s summer headquarters. It formed a part of Shahrigh Tehsil of Sibi District till 1974 when it was given the status of a sub-tehsil. The first building to come up there was the Political Agent's residence which was constructed in 1891 at a total cost of Rs. 19,666. Piped water was provided to the town in 1898-99 at a cost of Rs, 38,000. A summer camp for European troops stationed at Quetta was first set up at Ziarat in 1885. At that time income of this tiny town stood at Rs. 38010 and expenditure at Rs. 2,689. Before Independence, the camp offices of the Agent to the Governor General in Balochistan; the Revenue Commissioner, Balochistan; the Civil Surgeon, Balochistan; the Political Agent and the Colonization officer, Nasirabad, used to shift to Ziarat during the summer. Following the creation of Sibi Division in 1974, the divisional offices shifted to Ziarat during the summer.

The tribes of the area are Sarabgzais, Tarins, Syeds, Doomars and lsakhels - all Pashtoons. The people are generally sturdy and very hospitable. A trip to Ziarat from Quetta can be made by two routes one by the single road, which though a short-cut, is very difficult but full of fun and excitement for the hunters. The other is the Quetta- Karachi-Ziarat Road. It is a metalled road with road side tea shops. After traveling over 43 miles of the ragged country side one reaches Kachh where, besides a few tea shops, there is a Rest House equipped with necessary facilities. Thereafter a 33-mile long hilly track takes one to the green valley of Ziarat. This part of the journey is quite interesting and one comes across lofty hills covered with a thick juniper, patches of green fields and clean and cold water springs. There are many lovely walks through the wooden glades. Huge gorges and defiles constitute a feature of the scenery. For spending a holiday delightfully cool Ziarat is very pleasant and enjoyable,

Beside Juniper, which is the major species of trees, other major species include Wild Ash; Wild Almond; Olea species; Khujak. The magic of Ziarat lies in its honey-flowers which attain a large size here, its lush green grass and cool weather even in the hottest months of summer. 'Shinshoab' a lavender-like wild bush, looks lovely in twilights. Ziarat is also famous for its sweet apples, black and red cherry. The cherry season lasts from the 1st to 15th of June.

Within easy reach of the town, the Ziart (or sometimes Sandeman) Tangi (leftt) is a narrow gorge between lofty mountains culminates in a perennial spring. There are more than half a dozen gorges around Ziarat formed by natural 'Karez' - spring water falling through narrow openings amongst the mountain rocks producing a dramatic effect. The sound of waterfalls singing to the tune of solid rocks while passing through narrow gorges creates a mystic atmosphere. The famous gorges along the road to Ziarat are Chutair Tangi, Kahn Tangi, Kawas Tangi, Fern Tangi and Sandeman Tangi. One can approach easily to these gorges by diverting from the main road to have a picnic, adventure and fun. A walk to Chashma is favourite amongst joggers and those who wish to have a pleasant walk. Situated 6 km from Ziarat the 'Prospect Point' offers breathtaking view of the valley. It was because of its scenic beauty that a Hollywood film company included a few shots of the Sandeman Tangi in its film "Jengis Khan" in 1952.

Prospect Point is an excellent picnic spot 372 miles south of the town. There is a jeep able road but those who want to enjoy the scenic beauty at leisure can have a walk. The road which passes through the lofty hills and deep ravines overlooks the valley, about 1000 feet below, covered by the ever-green juniper trees. There is a newly constructed Rest House from where one could have a wonderful view of the valley particularly during the rainy season. Down below is the shrine of Kharwari Baba.

Quaid-E-Azam Residency:
Quaid-e-Azam residency with its lush green lawns, chinar trees and flower gardens commands a striking view of the whole valley. It is of historical importance, as the Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the Founder of Pakistan, stayed there during his last illness. It houses the relics of the Father of the Nation. The Residency was built in 1882 by the British and used by the Agent to the Governor General as his summer headquarters.


Untitled Document
 
 
This website is meant to provide information and help internet users to get the solution of their problems and update their knowledge
This website is only for public use. There is no copy rights of any text or images etc All contents can be reuse for positive purpose only
You are Visitor Number:  Online Users